Honeymoon to Nowhere Etsuko has fallen in love with the shy young university lecturer who clumsily courts her But her family objects to his past his father was a war criminal his deceased younger brother a murderer When

  • Title: Honeymoon to Nowhere
  • Author: Akimitsu Takagi Sadako Mizuguchi
  • ISBN: 9781569471548
  • Page: 122
  • Format: Paperback
  • Etsuko has fallen in love with the shy young university lecturer who clumsily courts her But her family objects to his past his father was a war criminal his deceased younger brother, a murderer When Etsuko lies to force the marriage through, she thinks their troubles are over, but on their wedding night, the groom leaves in response to an urgent phone call In the morEtsuko has fallen in love with the shy young university lecturer who clumsily courts her But her family objects to his past his father was a war criminal his deceased younger brother, a murderer When Etsuko lies to force the marriage through, she thinks their troubles are over, but on their wedding night, the groom leaves in response to an urgent phone call In the morning, he is still missing.

    • [PDF] Í Free Read ☆ Honeymoon to Nowhere : by Akimitsu Takagi Sadako Mizuguchi ↠
      122 Akimitsu Takagi Sadako Mizuguchi
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      Posted by:Akimitsu Takagi Sadako Mizuguchi
      Published :2019-05-15T04:51:46+00:00

    About “Akimitsu Takagi Sadako Mizuguchi

    1. Akimitsu Takagi Sadako Mizuguchi says:

      Akimitsu Takagi , Takagi Akimitsu , 25 September 1920 9 September 1995 , was the pen name of a popular Japanese crime fiction writer active during the Showa period of Japan His real name was Takagi Seiichi edit BiographyTakagi was born in Aomori City in Aomori Prefecture in northern Japan He graduated from the Daiichi High School which was often abbreviated to Ichi ko and Kyoto Imperial University, where he studied metallurgy He was employed by the Nakajima Aircraft Company, but lost his job with the prohibition on military industries in Japan after World War II.On the recommendation of a fortune teller, he decided to become a writer He sent the second draft of his first detective story, The Tattoo Murder Case, to the great mystery writer Edogawa Ranpo, who recognized his skill and who recommended it to a publisher It was published in 1948.He received the Tantei sakka club sho Mystery Writers Club Award for his second novel, the Noh Mask Murder Case in 1950.Takagi was a self taught legal expert and the heroes in most of his books were usually prosecutors or police detectives, although the protagonist in his first stories was Kyosuke Kamizu, an assistant professor at Tokyo University.Takagi explored variations on the detective novel in the 1960s, including historical mysteries, picaresque novels, legal mysteries, economic crime stories, and science fiction alternate history.In The Informer 1965 , a former Tokyo stock exchange worker is fired because of illegal trades A subsequent stock market crash means that he has no hope of returning to his old career and therefore he accepts a job from an old friend even though he eventually discovers that the new firm he works for is really an agency for industrial espionage The plot is based on actual events.He was struck by stroke several times since 1979, and died in 1995.From



    2 thoughts on “Honeymoon to Nowhere

    1. This is the first book of Takagi's that I have read and I really enjoyed it. Takagi creates a romance novel beginning and then quickly turns it on its head with a murder. It starts off innocently enough with 26-year-old Etsuko, chubby, awkward, and deemed an "old maid" by most of the people around her, especially her parents. She suffers through a painful, unrequited crush on her best friend's fiance and is too heartbroken to attend the wedding. Her father is trying to force her to marry a borin [...]

    2. Akimitsu Takagi's Honeymoon to Nowhere shows again the author's strengths and weaknesses. It is absolutely one of his novels, for all the good, and for all the bad.The story is pretty simple. Etsuko is trying to forget about Prosecutor Kirishima when she meets a professor from a small university, Yoshihiro Tsukamoto. He seems rather charming, in a clumsy kind of way, and she starts to fall in love with him. But there are a couple of strange things about him that make her wonder. And he seems to [...]

    3. This is the second of Akimitsu's book that I've read. I don't know if it's because the writing style is dry (as to be expected from an older novel), but I find this novel more tedious to read that the first one (Tattoo Murder Case). A certain plot device that was used in Tattoo Murder Case (view spoiler)[(a key witness who would have been able to shed light on the case was killed before the investigators could get information out of them) (hide spoiler)] was also present here. Perhaps it was Aki [...]

    4. Honeymoon to nowhereA woman coming out of a recent heartbreak is set by her parents to marry a man, while in the waiting period to answer she meets a man he wants to marry, against the parents’ wishes (based on the man family past) she marries him, but he is killed the night after they got married, a long line of problem with the family resurfaces and the case complicates when the brother of the murdered man is murdered.First part the romance, really fleshes out the feelings of Tetsuko, and gi [...]

    5. Lots of deceit within a family and then there's several lawyers who appear overly cooperative in a murder investigation. Takagi's writing is timeless. This takes place in 1960's Japan but it could be yesterday. Only cell phones are missing. What starts out as a young woman saying no to an arranged marriage ends up involving patents, right wing terrorists, greed, and murder. And you're totally clueless as to who is behind what's going down. Lots of characters whose first name begins with a "K" in [...]

    6. I selected this book because in its title it had the word 'Honeymoon' in it. Having written a non-fiction book 'Honeymoon! A Sizzle or a Fizzle?' I'm always on the lookout for information about Honeymoons.Would you believe that when you do a search for 'honeymoon' you get mainly works of fiction? As the title of this book warns, it is a nowhere honeymoon.Though the book starts slowly, once you're into the mystery it is a page turner. While the blurb on the cover talks abut 'full-blooded love aff [...]

    7. This is a Japanese translaton and the names make it hard to read. I liked the story, but not enough to want to read more by this author. Etsuko and Yoshihiro get married against her father's wishes, but they are in love. On their wedding night Yoshihiro gets a phone call and leaves Etsuko at the hotel. The next morning he is found murdered. The remainder of the book is the investigation into the murder and Yoshihiro's life. There is another murder that I didn't see coming which is a plus for me. [...]

    8. Etsuko Ogata is 26 and just getting over an infatuation with a man who is about to marry her best friend. Her father is extremely insistent that she marry his junior law partner. She has just enough of an independent streak to become engaged instead to a university lecturer. As implied by the title, the new husband does not make it through the wedding night and Saburo Kirishima, the prosecutor called in to supervise the investigation is the same man who was the object of Etsuko’s infatuation. [...]

    9. I like the Soho Crime books as much for the entrance they provide into other cultures as for the mysteries themselves. Takagi provides some glimpses into post-WWII Japan, but mostly this mystery deals with interior thoughts, only modestly describing Tokyo and Japanese life. As a psychological novel it was clunky - I pushed through to the end and enjoyed it more when Kirishima, the prosecutor, was center stage.

    10. This was a classic mystery, taking place in Japan. The end came as a surprise and I found this book engrossing for both its Japenese-ness and the twisty mystery plot. But to be honest, I judged this book by its title, which I still give five stars "Honey Moon to Nowhere" how dreamy.

    11. I did then didn't then finally did really enjoy this crime thriller -- strangely, I'd have to reread it again to fully appreciate it. It did strike me at the time in the same way the Zola's Therese Raquin did, if memory serves:)

    12. Old-school (not surprisingly: it was published in 1965). Clever, but too dated to really be of great interest.

    13. It's a very interesting mystery novel. It gets really slow and difficult to keep reading when the investigation begins, but still a very good book overall. C:

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